Andy headshot

Andrew Lambert

Andrew Lambert

Graduate Research Assistant
University of Utah, Department of Atmospheric Sciences

Skills: R, Matlab, web development, big data

Email: andy.lambert@utah.edu
Phone: 801-870-3681

About Me

I was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, but spent some of my early childhood years in Boise, Idaho before my family returned to Salt Lake. I have been married for nearly three years now and am the proud owner of an Australian cattle dog/Pomchi mix. The majority of my hobbies revolve around the weather, basketball, and food.

Professional Interests

I received a Bachelor of Science in atmospheric sciences from the University of Utah in 2018. I initially started my undergraduate career with a strong interest in meteorology and forecasting. I worked in the student-run Ute Weather Center as a programmer and chief meteorologist. My interests shifted toward climatology, though, as I took various climate, radiation, and remote sensing courses. In my junior year, I joined Professor Gannet Hallar’s aerosol research group where I began research involving air chemistry and cloud microphysics. During my time as an undergraduate student, I researched dust in the Intermountain West where I applied my experience in synoptic meteorology to aerosol research. I developed a climatology surrounding dust events and identified potential source regions. I will continue my research at the University of Utah as a graduate student in Dr. Gannet Hallar’s group. I am also participating as a member of the Alta dust-on-snow pilot study working with Dr. McKenzie Skiles from the University of Utah Geography Department and the University’s Society, Water and Climate research cluster.

Research Areas

  • Air Quality
  • Climate
  • Remote Sensing

Education

Degree

M.S.

B.S.

Field

University of Utah

University of Utah

Institution

Atmospheric Sciences

Atmospheric Sciences

Publications

Skiles, S.M., Mallia, D.V., Hallar, A.G., Lin, J.C., Lambert, A., Petersen, R. and Clark, S., 2018. Implications of a shrinking Great Salt Lake for dust on snow deposition in the Wasatch Mountains, UT, as informed by a source to sink case study from the 13–14 April 2017 dust event. Environmental Research Letters13(12), p.124031. link